Sunday, June 30, 2013

Limiting yourself to the amount of salt intake will harm your health.



Salt is one of the most important nutrients, yet modern medicine has been demonizing it for decades. Now, though, even the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) must admit that they’ve had it wrong. They commissioned a study by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and the results are clear: Reducing salt intake is almost always a bad idea.

The committee found no evidence for benefit and some evidence suggesting risk of adverse health outcomes associated with sodium intake levels in ranges approximately1,500 to 2,300 mg/day among those with diabetes, kidney disease, or CVD. The average American takes in 3,400 mg of salt a day, about 1½ teaspoons. The federal guidelines once stated that it should be brought down to less than 2,300 mg a day. It’s a good thing that people have not been following their doctors’ advice, because it would have been killing them. Low sodium intake may lead to adverse effects in people with mid- to late-stage heart failure who are receiving aggressive treatment for their disease.

At some point, you’d think that the truth about salt would sink in, but it never seems to happen. In fact, the page on which the CDC announces the new IOM report—which they
commissioned—shows absolutely no indication that there will be any rethinking of their salt reduction recommendations.

But a few of the population should keep sodium below 1,500 mg per day. Age over 51, have high blood pressure, who have severe & uncontrolled diabetes and chronic kidney diseased patients. Some evidence indicates that 1,500 to 2,300 mg of salt a day may have an adverse effect on people with diabetes, kidney disease, or heart disease.

Recent research has never documented that salt is harmful. It is, instead, a necessary nutrient. In most people, the ability to regulate salt is a simple matter that’s managed by your kidneys. Yes, too much salt is harmful, but very few people eat that amount. But public health agencies and doctors have latched onto the salt reduction mantra so firmly that it’s become equivalent to a thou-shalt-not. But it isn’t, as genuine research has shown again and again. So, it’s up to you to decide how to manage your health.

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Miracles Of Melatonin



Can reading yourself to sleep or texting into the wee hours of the morning raise your risk of cancer?
You bet it can. Exposing yourself to artificial light at night shuts down your body’s production of an important hormone called melatonin.

Melatonin has roles in cancer prevention, strengthening your immune system, and may even slowdown cellular aging; It’s your body’s “Superhero of the Night,” and light is his number one nemesis.

For the past century or so, the developed world has been performing an open-ended experiment on itself by lengthening its days and shortening its nights in an effort to become a 24-hour per day, ever-productive society. But light pollution generated by modern technologies is taking a heavy biological toll on humans, as well as other forms of life on Earth. For more than 200,000 years, humans and other life forms evolved organs that took advantage of environmental cues. We developed a biological clock governed by Earth’s cycles of light and darkness. Artificial lighting disrupts your biological clock and melatonin production, with unfortunate effects on your health.

In humans as with all mammals, your biological clock resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of your brain (SCN), which is part of your hypothalamus. Based on signals of light and darkness, your SCN tells your pineal gland when it’s time to secrete melatonin. Light comes in through your eyes and travels up your optic nerves to the SCN, which is exquisitely sensitive to cycles of light and darkness.
When you turn on a light at night, you immediately send your brain misinformation about the light-dark cycle. The only thing your brain interprets light to be is day. Believing daytime has arrived, your biological clock instructs your pineal gland to immediately cease its production of melatonin. Whether you have the light on for an hour or for just a second, the effect is the same — and your melatonin pump doesn’t turn back on when you flip the light back off.

Since humans evolved in the glow of firelight, the yellow, orange and red wavelengths don’t suppress melatonin production the way white and blue wavelengths do. In fact, the range of light that inhibits melatonin is fairly narrow — 460 to 480 nm. If you want to protect your melatonin, when the sun goes down you would shift to a low wattage bulb with yellow, orange, or red light, using a salt lamp illuminated by a 5-watt bulb in this color range.

The hormone melatonin produces a number of health benefits in terms of your immune system. It’s a powerful antioxidant and free radical scavenger that helps combat inflammation. In fact, melatonin is so integral to your immune system that a lack of it causes your thymus gland, a key component of your immune system, to atrophy. Melatonin may even have a role in slowing the aging of your brain. In addition to helping you fall asleep and bestowing a feeling of overall comfort and well being, melatonin has proven to have an impressive array of anti-cancer benefits. Melatonin inhibits the proliferation of a wide range of cancer cell types, as well as triggering cancer cell apoptosis (self destruction). The hormone also interferes with the new blood supply tumors require for their rapid growth (angiogenesis). Melatonin can boost efficacy and decrease the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy.

Glioblastoma is a nasty, aggressive form of brain cancer with a poor prognosis and not much in the way of effective treatments. However, melatonin may offer some hope. patients with a glioblastoma were given either radiation and melatonin, or radiation alone. Twenty-three percent of the patients receiving the melatonin were alive one year later, while none who received radiation alone were still alive. Another study found that melatonin reduced the growth of prostate cancer. Studies show similarly encouraging results for lung, pancreatic, colorectal and other types of cancer.

Two common environmental "noise" factors that can make sleep elusive are light pollution and temperature. The following suggestions can improve your sleep hygiene and help you optimize your melatonin production.

*.Avoid watching TV or using your computer in the evening, at least an hour or so before going to bed. These devices emit blue light, which tricks your brain into thinking it’s still daytime. Normally your brain starts secreting melatonin between 9 and 10 pm, and these devices emit light that may stifle that process.

*.Make sure you get BRIGHT sun exposure regularly. Your pineal gland produces melatonin roughly in approximation to the contrast of bright sun exposure in the day and complete darkness at night. If you are in darkness all day long, it can’t appreciate he difference and will not optimize your melatonin production.

*.Sleep in complete darkness, or as close to it as possible. Even the slightest bit of light in your bedroom can disrupt your biological clock and your pineal gland's melatonin production. Even the tiniest glow from your clock radio could be interfering with your sleep, so cover your radio up at night or get rid of it altogether. Move all electrical devices at least three feet away from your bed. You may want to cover your windows with drapes or blackout shades.

*.Install a low-wattage yellow, orange or red light bulb if you need a source of light for navigation at night. Light in these bandwidths does not shut down melatonin production in the way that white and blue bandwidth light does. Salt lamps are handy for this purpose.

*.Keep the temperature in your bedroom no higher than 70 degrees F. Many people keep their homes too warm (particularly their upstairs bedrooms). Studies show that the optimal room temperature for sleep is between 60 to 68 degrees.
*.Take a hot bath 90 to 120 minutes before bedtime. This increases your core body temperature, and when you get out of the bath it abruptly drops, signaling your body that you are ready to sleep.
*.Avoid using loud alarm clocks. Being jolted awake each morning can be very stressful. If you are regularly getting enough sleep, you might not even need an alarm.

*.Get some sun in the morning, if possible. Your circadian system needs bright light to reset itself. Ten to 15 minutes of morning sunlight will send a strong message to your internal clock that day has arrived, making it less likely to be confused by weaker light signals during the night. More sunlight exposure is required as you age.
*.Be mindful of electromagnetic fields in your bedroom. EMFs can disrupt your pineal gland and its melatonin production, and may have other negative biological effects as well. A gauss meter is required if you want to measure EMF levels in various areas of your home.


An Scientific Theory on Why Fixation of Males lies of Females Bosoms.

Why do men devote so much headspace to those big, bulbous bags of fat drooping from women's chests? Scientists have never satisfactorily explained men's curious breast fixation, but now, neuroscientists has struck upon an explanation human evolution has harnessed an ancient neural circuit that originally evolved to strengthen the mother-infant bond during breast-feeding, and now uses this brain circuitry to strengthen the bond between couples as well. The result? Men, like babies, love breasts.

When a woman's nipples are stimulated during breast-feeding, the neurochemical oxytocin, otherwise known as the "love drug," floods her brain, helping to focus her attention and affection on her baby. But research over the past few years has shown that in humans, this circuitry isn't reserved for exclusive use by infants. nipple stimulation enhances sexual arousal in the great majority of women, and it activates the same brain areas as vaginal and clitoral stimulation. When a sexual partner touches, massages or nibbles a woman's breasts, this triggers the release of oxytocin in the woman's brain, just like what happens when a baby nurses. But in this context, the oxytocin focuses the woman's attention on her sexual partner, strengthening her desire to bond with this person. In other words, men can make themselves more desirable by stimulating a woman's breasts during foreplay and sex. Evolution has, in a sense, made men want to do this.

Attraction to breasts is a brain organization effect that occurs in straight males when they go through puberty, Evolution has selected for this brain organization in men that makes them attracted to the breasts in a sexual context, because the outcome is that it activates the female bonding circuit, making women feel more bonded with him. It's a behavior that males have evolved in order to stimulate the female's maternal bonding circuitry.